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The Top Pandemic Strategies to Take Back With You to the Office

The Top Pandemic Strategies to Take Back With You to the Office

There is no doubt that COVID-19 has changed the way we work. While some organizations have embraced the remote workforce since the start of the pandemic, others plan their strategies for when and how their employees will return to the office.

Although there have been many challenges, organizations also have opportunities to reimagine their workspaces and workforces. In planning strategies for moving forward, business leaders need to think creatively in harnessing these opportunities and adopting some of the pandemic tools they have been using so far.

Here are our top four pandemic strategies to take back with you to the office:

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Staying connected while apart

Keeping remote workers connected has been a priority for companies during the pandemic. As social distancing is likely to stay for the foreseeable future, managers will continue to face the challenges of integrating both in-person and remote teams.

With virtual meetings via video conferencing apps safer than in-person meetings, technology will remain at the forefront of managing remote collaboration.

Microsoft Teams has developed some great features to help you manage socially distanced team members. These include Whiteboards for virtual brainstorming, Together Mode to replicate a virtual meeting room, and creating channels to handle specific tasks and projects. Reaction icons in Teams is also a fun option for members to communicate during virtual meetings, adding a more personal and interactive touch to the virtual office space.

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Putting health and safety first

As they did during the height of the pandemic, business leaders must prioritize both the physical and mental well-being of their in-office employees.

Issues that should be considered include physical distancing, transport needs (if employees are at increased risk on public transport), access to and from the building and within offices (elevators, busy corridors), food and beverage policies, the provision of personal protective equipment, and cleaning and sanitization protocols. These are likely to be ongoing matters, and responses should evolve along with official regulations.

As with stores and other public spaces, organizations can use many pandemic tactics in the office space to keep employees safe. For example, you can limit the number of people in the office, use arrows for one-way traffic around the space, have sanitizer at set stations, plexiglass to separate workstations, and ensure that employees are wearing the appropriate protective equipment.

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A remote workforce is a diverse workforce

Although some enterprises may prefer having in-person teams, a key advantage of having a remote workforce is having a more diverse team; the hiring process does not need to include consideration of an employee’s proximity to the office. This means a more global and inclusive workforce is possible, and organizations can expand their talent pool geographically. This is certainly one aspect of the pandemic working environment that enterprises can use to their advantage.

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Encouraging a flexible work culture

The pandemic has resulted in a more casual and flexible work culture, and this is something that organizations should consider when it comes to returning to the physical office.

Employees have become used to the flexibility of working from home, setting their hours and not having the morning rush to get to the office, wearing more casual and comfortable clothing, and taking things at a more reasonable pace. When employees have more autonomy over their work experience, their productivity and creativity often improve.

This more flexible approach to work should also be accompanied by a focus on productivity and objectives rather than set hours and tasks. Concurrently, there will still need to be clear boundaries between work and home time and clear expectations across the board regarding deliverables.

How designDATA can aid your return to the office

Any return to the office strategy should prioritize access to standardized, modern technology for both in-office and remote workers. designDATA’s HaaS experts can provide customized, budget-friendly solutions to your organization’s technology needs. Investing in a HaaS plan will give you access to both the technology and the support needed to keep your organization functioning. 

Closing the Home Office Security Gap

Working from home has long been a favorite dream of many office workers. Recent developments in cloud technology and video conferencing enabled companies to offer part-time or permanent remote options to some workers. Experts predicted this trend would increase, but no one expected a global pandemic to make the dream of working from home a reality for millions.

When COVID hit, companies quickly pivoted to remote operations. No one knew how long the situation would last, and the initial focus was on maintaining worker productivity. The new way of working allowed business to continue, but it came with some challenges, too. Remote work isn’t going away any time soon, and it’s time for companies to get serious about home office security.

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With new ways of working come new ways for cybercriminals to attack. Hackers and other malicious cyber actors are attacking remote workers with three primary tactics:

Email & phishing scams – Hackers are taking advantage of the COVID-19 crisis to launch phishing attacks through email, texts, and social media. The fraudulent emails are often cleverly disguised as helpful information from company leadership or as requests from the company for personal information. Working in isolation from co-workers makes it harder for employees to discern whether emails about a company’s COVID status or policies are real or fake.

Unsecured wi-fi network infiltration – Devices connected to unprotected home networks are an easy target for cybercriminals. They take advantage of this vulnerability to steal data and passwords and to intercept sensitive messages.

Personal computer hacks – A large percentage of workers admit to using their personal devices for work-related purposes. Employees often transfer company data to personal devices for convenience or other reasons. This makes the data vulnerable to attacks – especially since many people don’t regularly install security updates on their devices, nor do those devices have all of the protective software that a business-owned device would.

What Can Business Leaders do?

Excellent cybersecurity starts with savvy leaders who understand the risks and implement smart policies to keep home offices secure. Here are three policies business leaders can introduce to set their companies up for home office security success.

Disallow the use of personal computers

Make sure all employees have company devices. Set the clear expectation that business data is never to be transferred to or accessed from personal computers. Suppose bring-your-own-device is already part of your culture. In that case, you can work with your IT Team to develop standards that users of personal devices need to adhere to, such as installing the organization’s antivirus or patching tools.

Make sure data is stored securely in business-approved repositories

Many employees have a personal Dropbox or other cloud-based data storage account. They also often store data on their local hard drives. Set up easy-to-use company data repositories and implement policies that prevent workers from using their personal accounts to store and share company data.

Require relevant Cybersecurity Awareness Training

Train employees on relevant security topics such as “how to recognize phishing attacks,” “proper password management,” and “company cybersecurity best practices.” Adequate training resources are available, and leaders should make sure their employees participate regularly.

What Can IT Teams do?

Leaders set cybersecurity policies, but IT Teams make recommendations and do the technical work to implement the policies and procedures that secure company networks and data. Here are four technical strategies IT Teams can use to help employees keep company data safe while working from home.

Use Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA)

Passwords and physical devices are both relatively easy to steal. By requiring more than one form of identification to access company devices and systems, IT Teams can prevent malicious actors from accessing company data. MFA is especially important for controlling access to publicly-accessible services such as Microsoft 365.

Require a VPN connection to access company data & applications

VPNs boost security by providing a secure connection to the company network for remote employees. Employees should only be able to access internal company data and applications through a VPN. Ensure the VPN is configured with network segmentation and profiles, so each department or external vendor account only has access to the servers or devices needed to do the job. For example, a Marketing user’s VPN shouldn’t allow them to ping the Accounting server. Also, an external vendor that uses the VPN to help manage a database application shouldn’t be able to access a File server through the VPN.

Use Remote Monitoring & Management Tools to monitor devices

These tools help IT Teams ensure that all devices being used by employees are up to date on security patches and antivirus updates and allow helpdesk employees to assist remote users with requests directly.

Deploy a business password management tool

Employees are notorious for writing passwords on sticky notes or storing them in files on their desktop. Give workers a more secure and convenient option by providing a business-approved password management tool to help them create strong passwords and keep them organized. Talk to your IT service provider for recommendations.

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What Can Employees Do?

All the best leaders and most tech-savvy IT Teams in the world can’t secure a home office if the employees don’t cooperate. The following actions will ensure employees do their part to maintain cybersecurity while working remotely.

Protect your home wireless network with a password

This seems simple, but many employees either have open home wireless networks or have never changed the default password. You should set a strong password for your home wi-fi network and make sure not to post it where it can be easily seen.

Cooperate with company policies

Corporate cybersecurity policies about passwords, personal devices, and document storage can seem burdensome or paranoid. These things pose real risks to company data security, and there are real consequences if employees don’t cooperate with the policies. Employees should be diligent in complying with all company cybersecurity policies and best practices.

Be wary of suspicious emails and attachments

Hackers and other cybercriminals often pose as managers or team members in emails, chats or meeting requests. Remote work makes it both more complicated and critical for employees to carefully identify the people they interact with. To maintain home office security, employees must be rigorous about identifying everyone they meet or share company information with.

Want to Learn More?

The steps we’ve described in this article will help you get started securing your employees’ home offices, but there’s a lot more to make sure your company has excellent cybersecurity. If you would like more information, check out our free cybersecurity resources. Ready to take action? Book a Security Assessment with one of designDATA’s cybersecurity experts to get started.

Better internet security: Easy as 1, 2, 3

The internet is not such a bad place to be in — for as long as website owners do their share in keeping it safe for their visitors. Here are three tips to do exactly just that.

Tip #1: Use HTTPS

Short for Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure, HTTPS indicates that a website has an extra layer of security for its users. This layer encrypts data exchanged between a user’s browser and the web server that delivers the data that the user requests. To use a simpler comparison, imagine someone tapping your landline, but instead of getting to listen in on your conversations, they’ll hear people speaking in tongues instead.

In August 2014, Google Chrome, the world’s most popular browser, announced that having HTTPS makes your website rank higher in its search algorithm. And since October 2017, the browser began flagging non-HTTPS websites as not secure whenever users try to fill out something as simple as a contact form on it. In July 2018, Chrome started showing a “not secure” warning on any website that does not implement HTTPS, whether or not users are filling out a form there.

Because of Google’s measures, the security protocol has been widely adopted. Even if your website does not contain or ask for sensitive information, implementing HTTPS on it engenders trust and a sense of security among internet users, while staying left behind security-wise will make web visitors abandon or avoid you sooner or later.

Tip #2: Embrace multifactor authentication (MFA)

Since account credentials can be easily stolen via phishing attacks, username and password combos are no longer enough to keep bad actors at bay. To ensure that the one accessing an account is truly that account’s owner, additional identity authentication steps must be implemented.

These steps can involve the use of the account holder’s device — the one logging in must first verify their phone number, receive a one-time password on their smartphone, then enter that code in the access portal before the validity of the code lapses. Alternatively, MFA may ask for a face, retina, voice, or fingerprint scan for authentication. MFA can be a bit of a hassle for your internal and external users, but a little inconvenience is a small price to pay for immensely effective cybersecurity.

Tip #3: Update browsers and devices

Did you know that dated versions of browsers, operating systems (OSs), and even other software packages can create an easy entry point for hackers? Often, new updates are created specifically to fix security holes. And hackers are ever aware that people can be lazy, saving that update for another day that never seems to come. They’ll often try to take advantage of this, searching for outdated devices to infiltrate while their victims watch YouTube on last year’s version of Firefox.

Yes, installing an update might take 15 minutes of your time. But it can pay dividends in preventing a security breach that could cost you or your business thousands.

Looking for more tips to boost your internet security? Get in touch to find out how we can help.

Tips and tricks for collecting customer data

Businesses have more access to customer data than ever before, and that trend will likely continue in the future. The insights you get from all that data are valuable. However, a lot of data is unnecessary or possibly even problematic. To ensure your insights are relevant and useful, you must have a well-defined data collection system in place.

Before we jump into our tips for data collection, we have to address the elephant in the room: customer privacy. Despite all the recent regulatory frameworks for protecting people’s private information, there are still a number of opportunities for you to collect data without running afoul of the law. However, honesty is the best business policy. Never ask for a customer’s personal information unless you are absolutely sure that they are aware of the exchange.

With that out of the way, let’s get to it!

1. Collect identifiers

Whether you’re creating an online survey or a signup form, collecting identifying information (i.e. names, date of birth, age, gender, address, etc.) is crucial. This information will form the foundation for future analysis and segmentation.

2. Track customer interactions

Next is to define important customer interactions. For example, if you own an online store, you need to know how your customers arrived at your site, the items they clicked on, items they added to their cart, and what they eventually purchased. Tracking each step of their journey — from learning about your business to becoming a customer — will give you insights into what your customers need and want.

3. Gather behavior-related data

Don’t focus solely on customers who made a purchase. Think about what other indicators produce meaningful data. In our online store example, you might want to track how many receive your email newsletter, how many pages they visited on your site, or how much time they spent on each page. Analyzing this information will help you determine which aspects of your efforts are most effective.

4. Automate data collection

When gathering customer data, you must minimize the risk of human error. The most effective strategy is to automate as much of the collection process as possible. Apps and tools such as online forms and optical character recognition systems feed information directly into your database and eliminate paper-centric processes that often lead to mistakes.

5. Integrate your systems

Redundancies and errors are also common when there are multiple databases managing the same information. You can prevent these issues by working with an IT provider to integrate all your apps, databases, and software solutions. This way, data collected in one database will be synced and consistent across other platforms, reducing manual data entry.

6. Consider who will view the reports

Inevitably, you’ll need to turn data into business intelligence reports. It’s a good idea to identify who will read your reports and highlight the most relevant insights. For instance, sales managers want to see quarterly sales figures, and human resources teams want to see labor costs compared to revenue. Using the right tools to generate these reports will save your team several hours of work.

7. Update data in real-time

It’s difficult to imagine any company in operation today that doesn’t need up-to-the-minute data accuracy. Business intelligence dashboards collect, organize, and filter data at the click of a button. This way, you’ll never have to wait a day or more to receive information that’s critical for a company decision.

Looking for technologies that can help you optimize data collection? Call our IT consultants today. We’ll recommend best-of-breed technologies that track the information you need to grow your business.

5 Security issues to look out for

The security of your systems and technology is a constant battle, and one you will likely never completely win. There are significant steps you can take to secure your systems, but having knowledge about your systems is one of the most effective tools. If you know how your systems can be breached, you can ensure a higher level of caution and security. Here are five common ways business systems are breached.

#1. You are tricked into installing malicious software

One of the most common ways a system’s security is breached is through downloaded malware. In almost every case where malware is installed, the user was tricked into downloading it.

A common trick used by hackers is planting malware in software hosted on warez and torrent websites. When users visit the site, they are informed that they need to download the software in order for the site to load properly. Once downloaded, the malware infects the system. In other cases, hackers send emails with a malware-infected attachment.

There is a nearly limitless number of ways you can be tricked into downloading and installing malware. Luckily, there are steps you can take to avoid this:

  • Never download files from an untrusted location. If you are looking at a website that is asking you to download something, make sure it’s from a company you know and trust. If you are unsure, it’s best to avoid downloading and installing the software.
  • Always look at the name of the file before downloading. A lot of malware is often disguised with names that are similar to legitimate files, with only a slight spelling mistake or some weird wording. If you are unsure about the file, then don’t download it. Instead, contact us so we can verify its authenticity.
  • Stay away from torrents, sites with adult content, and video streaming sites. These sites often contain malware, so avoid them altogether.
  • Always scan a file before installing it. Use your antivirus scanner to check downloaded apps before opening them. Most scanners are equipped to do this by right-clicking the file and selecting Scan.

#2. Hackers are able to modify the operating system (OS) settings

Many users are logged into their computers as admins. Being an administrator allows you to change all settings, install programs, and manage other accounts.

If a hacker manages to access your computer with you as the admin, they will have full access to your computer. This means they could install other malicious software, change settings, or even completely hijack the machine. The biggest worry about this, however, is if a hacker gets access to a computer used to manage the overall network. Should this happen, they could gain control of the entire network and do as they please.

To avoid this, limit the administrator role only to users who need to install applications or change settings on the computer. Beyond this, installing security software like antivirus scanners and keeping them up to date, as well as conducting regular scans, will help reduce the chances of being infected, or seeing infections spread.

#3. Someone physically accesses your computer

These days, it seems like almost every security threat is trying to infect your IT infrastructure from the outside. However, there are many times when malware is introduced into systems, or data is stolen, because someone has physically accessed your systems.

Let’s say you leave your computer unlocked when you go for lunch and someone walks up to it, plugs in a malware-infected USB drive, and physically infects your system. They could also access your system and manually reset the password, thereby locking you out and giving them access.

Secure yourself by setting up a password to control access to your computer. You should also lock, turn off, or log off from your computer whenever you step away from it.

Beyond that, disable drives like CD/DVD and connections like USB if you don’t use them. This will limit the chances of anyone using these removable media to infect your computer.

#4. Someone from within the company infects the system

We’ve seen a number of infections and security breaches that were carried out by a disgruntled employee. They could delete essential data, or remove it from the system completely. Some have even gone so far as to introduce highly destructive malware. The most effective way to prevent this, aside from ensuring your employees are happy, is to limit access to systems.

Your employees don’t need access to everything, so reexamine what your employees have access to and make the necessary adjustments. For example, you may find that people in marketing have access to finance files or even admin panels. Revoke unnecessary access rights and ensure that employees only have access to the files they need.

#5. Your password is compromised

Your password is the main way you can verify and access your accounts and systems. The issue is, many people have weak passwords. And with the steady increase in the number of stolen user account data, it could only be a matter of time before they can crack your password and compromise your account.

To add insult to injury, many people use the same password for multiple accounts, which could lead to a massive breach. Therefore, you should use strong and different passwords for your accounts.

To further enhance your password security, utilize multifactor authentication (MFA), which uses more than one method of verifying a user’s identity, such as a fingerprint or a one-time code.

If you are looking to learn more about securing your systems, contact us today to learn how our services can help.

Represent your business properly on social media

Social media accounts for businesses are invaluable tools enterprises use to reach out to their client bases to fully understand their needs and wants. Make sure your social media manager understands the proper way to interact with people online, especially those with bad things to say about the company.

Online reputation management mistakes

As long as you have a successful business or brand, people will always have something to say about it. And when it comes to online reputation management, the goal is to create positive engagement with your customers. So if the discussion about your brand swings negative, here are a few online reputation blunders to avoid.

  • Reacting to negative commentary – Negative commentary is generally any commentary that constitutes a verbal attack. As a rule, if it isn’t constructive criticism, it’s probably negative commentary. Feel free to ignore these comments because engaging with them will escalate the conversation further, and fueling those flames are never good for business. It is one thing to stand up for values and principles in a diplomatic manner, and it is a completely different thing to engage in a word war with online commenters who will likely not endure any adverse effects to their negative commentary.
  • Reacting emotionally – If your reaction to negative comments is to fire back with negative comments, you’ll appear unprofessional. Customers want to do business with a brand that is professional. If you react emotionally or negatively to a customer online, who’s to say you wouldn’t do the same in real life to the person reading it? As a social media manager, you are the voice of the business. If your voice is abrasive, immature, and easy to bait into a pissing contest, best believe that your customers will see your business in the same light.

How to resolve negative commentary

While a negative comment about your brand may upset you, don’t let your emotions get the better of you and post something you’ll later regret. Instead, calm down, compose yourself, and follow these guidelines.

  • Figure out what the customer really wants – Every customer wants their problem to be resolved, but how they want their issue fixed will vary. Some customers want an apology, others want a refund, and some may simply want the product they ordered but did not receive. Just because the customer’s comments are poorly phrased doesn’t mean that they don’t have a legitimate grievance. Learn to ignore the personal attack and carefully draw out the true cause for concern.
  • Stick to the facts – When engaging with a customer online, the initial comment can quickly turn into a back-and-forth discussion. If this happens, don’t get off topic when addressing the problem. The customer may try to engage you in a he-said-she-said battle, but avoid taking the bait. Respond with facts, stick to the matter at hand, and don’t get caught up in personal accusations.
  • Turn the negative into a positive – Negative feedback is an opportunity to improve your business. So be honest with yourself and, if there’s truth in the comment, take a good hard look at your company. Did the commenter point out a glaring problem you can improve upon? Remember, a business is nothing without its customers, so it makes sense to do your best to please them.

To learn more about how to best manage your online reputation, or for assistance with any of your IT needs, get in touch with our experts today.

A complete guide to juice jacking

Smartphones have become such a vital component of the modern lifestyle to the point that we are always glued to them. And as our time with our gadgets increases, the need to recharge them while we’re on the go also increases. When you’re nowhere near your charger and your juice runs out, that public charging kiosk can look pretty promising. But what you might not know is that recharging phones through public chargers can make you a victim of “juice jacking.” If you’re not sure what that is, read on to find out what makes it dangerous.

What’s juice jacking?

While newer phones have ditched the cable charger and moved on to wireless charging, older models still rely on power cords to transmit power to the mobile device. The problem with this setup is that the cable used for charging can also be used for transferring data. This setup is easily exploitable, and trust opportunists to do just that. When you use a public cable, they gain user access by leveraging the USB data/power cable to illegitimately access your phone’s data and/or inject malicious code into your device.

Attacks can be an invasion of privacy: your phone pairs with a computer concealed within the charging kiosk, and information such as private photos and contact information are transferred to a malicious computer. The computer can then access a host of personal information on the device, including your address book, notes, photos, music, SMS database, and keyboard cache. It can even initiate a full backup of your phone, all of which can be accessed wirelessly anytime.

But attacks can also be in the form of malicious code directly injected into your phone. A public USB hub can be used to transmit malware-ridden programs or tracking applications to the user’s mobile phone. All it takes is one minute of being plugged into a harmful charger.

How to avoid juice jacking

The most effective precaution is simply not charging your phone using a third-party system. Here are some tips to help you avoid using a public kiosk charger:

  • Keep your battery full. Make it a habit to charge your phone at your home and office when you are not actively using it or are just sitting at your desk working. When unexpected circumstances happen and you get stuck outside, your phone has juice.
  • Carry a personal charger. Chargers have become very small and portable, from USB cables to power banks. Always have one in your bag so you can charge your phone securely from a power outlet or on the go using a power bank.
  • If possible, carry a backup battery. If you’re not keen on bringing a spare charger or power bank, you can opt to carry a spare battery if your device has a removable battery, or a battery case (a phone case that doubles as a battery).
  • Lock your phone. Without the proper PIN code, fingerprint scan, or face ID, your phone cannot be paired with the device it’s connected to.
  • Use power-only USB cables. These cables are missing the two wires necessary for data transmission and have only the two wires for power transmission. They will charge your device, but data transfer is impossible.

Technology threats are all around us. Even the tiniest detail like charging your phone at a kiosk charger could affect the security of your device.

Looking to learn more about today’s security and threats? Contact us today and see how we can help.

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No ransom: A place for free decryption

Although a ransomware attack may seem targeted, you’re not the only one who’s been infected. Ransomware is spreading at an alarming rate, and the further it goes, the more resources are allocated to fighting it. If your data is held hostage, refer to this list of free decryptors you can use.

The state of ransomware in 2019

For businesses, the challenge of dealing with ransomware is both from outside and within. On the one hand, there are more cybercriminals trying to infiltrate your network. And thanks to an ever-increasing variety of social engineering scams, there are more internal staff members who are tricked into providing sensitive information or downloading malware.

The statistics are sobering. Ransomware cost businesses more than $75 billion per year. Over the past two years, ransomware attacks have increased by over 97%. And compared to 2017, this year’s ransomware from phishing emails increased by 109%.

According to studies, by 2021 there will be a ransomware attack targeting a business every 11 seconds. That is up from every 14 seconds in 2019, and every 40 seconds in 2016.

Zombie ransomware is easy to defeat

Not every type of infection is targeted to individual organizations. Some infections may result from self-propagating ransomware strains, while others may come from cyberattackers who are hoping targets become so scared that they pay up before doing any research on how dated the strain is and how to remove it.

No matter what the circumstances of your infection are, always check the following lists to see whether free decryption tools have been released to save you a world of hurt:

Prevention

But even when you can get your data back for free, getting hit with malware is no walk in the park. There are essentially three basic approaches to prevent ransomware.

First, train your employees about what they should and shouldn’t open when browsing the web and checking email.

Second, back up your data as often as possible to quarantined storage. As long as access to your backed-up data is extremely limited and not directly connected to your network, you should be able to restore everything in case of an infection.

Finally, regularly update all your software solutions (operating systems, productivity software, and antivirus). Most big-name vendors are quick to patch vulnerabilities, and you’ll prevent a large portion of infections just by staying up to date.

Whether it’s dealing with an infection or preventing one, the best option is to always seek professional advice from seasoned IT technicians. It’s possible that you could decrypt your data with the tools listed above, but most ransomware strains destroy your data after a set time limit, and you may not be able to beat the clock. And even if you do, you probably won’t have the expertise to discern where your security was penetrated.

Don’t waste time-fighting a never-ending stream of cyberattacks — hand it over to us and be done with it. Call us today to find out more.

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Why dashboards are vital to your business

People are visual creatures, which means we interpret visual data better than written words. That’s why most businesses turn to dashboards as a business intelligence tool to present data in a way that’s easy to understand. Dashboards have become a critical part of the analytics process. Here are some common uses of dashboards across various business functions.

Marketing insights

An organization’s marketing department typically analyzes a significant amount of data from various channels. Whether the purpose is to forecast monthly sales, predict trends, or build marketing strategies, marketing officers use dashboards to compare, sort, and analyze raw data to churn out meaningful information presented in an easy-to-understand format. This allows key decision-makers to easily make decisions using that information.

Tracking sales opportunities

Sales dashboards are perfect for tracking products and services. They help you identify sales opportunities by monitoring top-selling products and comparing the growth in revenue on a periodical basis. They sync to your raw data, so your charts are always up to date, thus eliminating the need to spend hours manually entering and preparing sales reports and charts.

Social media management

Social media management is more than just posting regularly on your business’s social media accounts. And in most cases, your social media platform’s default dashboard doesn’t give you deep insight into your social media campaigns. What’s more, managing multiple social media accounts can quickly become a cumbersome process since you have to use several login credentials. Instead, you can manage your accounts all at once through a comprehensive social media dashboard, saving you valuable time and effort.

Financial reports

Presenting financial data is so complex that it often leads to misinterpretation and misunderstanding of critical data. Dashboards make creating financial reports much easier, and financial analysts can take advantage of dashboards to display sensitive data in a comprehensible graphical format — be it customer invoices, progress toward revenue goals, or business expenses.

Project collaboration

Businesses of all sizes require their employees to collaborate on projects, whether on-site or online. Project supervisors need to get their teams together to give them projects’ requirements, deadlines, and responsibilities, and to get progress updates. With the help of project collaboration dashboards, members will see the complete workflow of the project, allowing for a more efficient and collaborative working environment.

Dashboards eliminate the complications of presenting complex business data and make your team more efficient. If you’re looking to implement dashboards and other cutting-edge tools to make your job easier, contact our consultants today.

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Keeping Facebook and Twitter safe from hackers

Keep your guard up! Pranksters, malicious attackers, and hackers come in different forms, but they are all after your online privacy and security — especially on social media. There are several things you can do to protect your Facebook and Twitter accounts.

Lock screens exist for a reason

Lock all your computing devices as soon as you stop using them. This way, you are safe from the simplest hack of all: someone opening a browser on your computer that has your social media login saved. 

Strong passwords are never out of fashion

Unlocking your phone may be limited to a six-digit passcode, but you’ll need something much more complicated for your account password. Create a password that you don’t use for any other account because with the regular occurrence of data breaches, hackers probably already have a long list of your favorite passwords from other websites and platforms. 

It is best to use a password manager like an app or online service that allows you to generate and retrieve complex passwords.

You can also enable two-factor authentication, which requires a secondary verification step such as a code sent to your phone. Even if hackers have your password, they won’t be able to log in without your phone.

Make use of social media features

Facebook can help you keep tabs on who’s accessing your account and from where. Click on the down arrow located at the upper right corner of your Newsfeed and select Settings. Then click Security and Login to get more information. If you sense an imposter, click the right-hand icon so you can log out remotely or report the person.

From there, turn on Get alerts about unrecognized logins to get notifications via Facebook, Messenger, or email if someone is logged into your account from an unrecognized browser. Unfortunately, Twitter doesn’t have the same option (which makes the two-factor authentication extremely necessary).

Hackers can also barge into your Facebook and Twitter accounts through third-party services that you’ve given access to your profiles, so make sure to double-check what you have approved.

  • Facebook: Go to Settings > Apps and Websites to view and manage outside service with access to your account
  • Twitter: Go to Settings and Privacy > Apps to check and edit the list

Lastly, be sure to check the permissions Facebook and Twitter have on your smartphone or tablet.

  • Android: Go to Settings > Apps > App permissions
  • iOS: Go to Settings > Privacy to manage which service can access which parts of your phone
Less personal info, fewer problems

These steps are just the beginning of what you should be doing. You should also limit the personal data you input into your social media accounts. Avoid oversharing.

By following these tips, you can prevent Facebook and Twitter hacking. 

Cybersecurity is a sprawling issue and social media privacy is such a small sliver of what you need to stay on top of. For 24/7 support, call our team of experts today.